Vibration Research- Speaking Events

Upcoming Speaking Event Schedule


Solasa Harish

Using Kurtosion to Improve Your Random Vibration Testing

Date: December 1, 2017 - TIme: TBD

Hotel Domus Maria, Vilnius, Lithuania

Pavel Fiser will be presenting at the JVE Vibroengineering Conference.

 


Aaron Offringa

Estimation of a PSD from a Known Noise Source

Date: December 6 : 11:30am – 11:50am

George R. Brown Convention Center, Houston, Texas

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the SpaceCom Conference.

 

Abstract: Random vibration control systems produce a Power Spectral Density (PSD) plot by averaging Fast Fourier Transforms. Modern controllers can set the DOF, or number of frames involved in the averaged PSD signal. The PSD is a way to present a random signal—which by nature “bounces” about the mean, at times making high excursions from the mean—in a format that makes it easy to determine the validity of a test. This process takes time as many frames of data are collected in order to generate the PSD and a test can appear to be out of tolerance until the controller has enough data. Something is awry with a PSD that achieves total in-tolerance immediately after starting or during level changes, and this can create dangerous over or under test conditions within specific frequency bands and should be avoided. This paper intends to treat some of the inherent properties of the PSD and some faulty PSD methods that attempt to circumvent these inherent properties.


Ryan B

Vibration Testing Sine vs. Random

Date: December 16 : Time - TBD

Patong Merlin Hotel, Phuket, Thailand

Ryan Becker will be presenting at the 30th International Conference on Vibroengineering.

 

Abstract: With vibration testing, there are many different test types that can be used to create a test. Two of the most common are sine and random. A common question is often asked: which of these two test types should be run on their product? When presented with both sine and random testing, is it possible to determine which test is most severe? If the goal of a test is to quickly pinpoint flaws in a product and I can only run 1 test, which test should I run? This presentation will attempt to answer these questions as well as which test is more severe, sine or random vibration.


Dan Pichan

Fatigue Damage: Combine, Compare and Quantify

Date: January 11, 2018: 13:45 – 14:30

Chennai Trade Centre Complex, Chennai, India

Dan Pichan will be presenting at the Automotive Testing Expo2018 India.

 

Abstract: Fatigue damage is a common and predictable cause of damage in the supply chain. The Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) is an abstraction that helps engineers make decisions in several ways. First, the FDS can be used to design and shorten a random vibration test based on combined time domain data. Second, the FDS can be used to compare time-domain waveforms in terms of fatigue. Third, being able to quantify the end-use environment to the vibration profiles running on the shaker gives confidence when going from field to lab. The ability to combine, compare and quantify environments and testing makes the FDS a powerful tool for test design and product analysis.


Jordan Van Baren

Estimation of a Power Spectral Density from a Known Noise Source

Date: February 12 : TBD

Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando, FL

Jordan Van Baren will be presenting at the IMAC Conference 2018.

 

Abstract: Random vibration control systems produce a Power Spectral Density (PSD) plot by averaging Fast Fourier Transforms. Modern controllers can set the DOF, or number of frames involved in the averaged PSD signal. The PSD is a way to present a random signal—which by nature “bounces” about the mean, at times making high excursions from the mean—in a format that makes it easy to determine the validity of a test. This process takes time as many frames of data are collected in order to generate the PSD and a test can appear to be out of tolerance until the controller has enough data. Something is awry with a PSD that achieves total in-tolerance immediately after starting or during level changes, and this can create dangerous over or under test conditions within specific frequency bands and should be avoided. This paper intends to treat some of the inherent properties of the PSD and some faulty PSD methods that attempt to circumvent these inherent properties.


Fatigue Damage Spectrum: Product Failure and Analysis

Date: March 15 : TBD

KINTEX, Goyang, South Korea

David Yoon will be presenting at the Automotive Testing Expo 2018.

 

Abstract: Fatigue damage is a common and predictable cause of damage in the supply chain. The Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) is an abstraction that helps engineers make decisions in several different ways. First, the FDS can be used to design and shorten a random vibration test based on combined time domain data. Second, the FDS can be used to compare time-domain waveforms in terms of fatigue. Third, being able to quantify the end-use environment to the vibration profiles running on the shaker gives confidence when going from field to lab. The ability to combine, compare and quantify environments and testing makes the FDS a powerful tool for test design and product analysis.

**More speaking events, tbd

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