Vibration Research- Speaking Events

Upcoming Speaking Event Schedule



Andy Cogbill

Using Fatigue Damage Spectrum for Accelerated Testing with Correlation to End-Use Environment

Date: June 13, 2017 - 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

DeVos Place Convention Center (Grand Gallery Room B) Grand Rapids, MI

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the SAE 2017 Noise and Vibration Conference.

 

Abstract: The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests.


Kevin Van Popering

Acquiring Field Data and Creating Vibration Tests

Date: June 16, 2017 - 8:00 am

Hyatt Regency, Rochester, NY

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the Vibration Institute Training Conference.

 

Abstract: Today’s vibration testing standards are intended to simulate the field environments a product, device or package will experience in the real world. Products are tested for a wide range of reasons, from R&D, to production, to life testing. Understanding how a product will react to the real world and the end-use environment is critical. It is common practice to collect field data from the end-use environment to verify the testing conditions have accounted for all the real-world conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the variety of testing options available for the collected data. This includes playing back the recorded data on a shaker in real time, also referred to as long time-history playback. Other options discussed will be FFT transformation with average and peak-hold methods, the influence of kurtosis on the recorded data, and the proper use of the fatigue damage spectrum to generate a random PSD.


Holger

Sine vs. Random, Shock and SRS in Vibration Testing

Date: June 21, 2017 - 10:55am

Messe Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany

Holger Boller will be presenting at the Automotive Testing Expo 2017 Europe.

 

Abstract: In the vibration world, there are quite a few test "types" to which you can expose your product. The major choices are Sine, Random, Classical Shock, Transient Shock, SRS, Sine-on-Random, and Random-on-Random. Frequently, customers will request advice on which type of test to run on their product, and in particular, how to choose between the common test types. Good to know which test, Sine or Random, is best to most quickly pinpoint flaws in my product. If I can run one test, either Sine or Random, which should it be? Or when I have measured a transient pulse in reality – how can I simulate this pulse in my laboratory? What are the significant parameters here? Let's take a look at these tests and discuss how we can give an answer to this question.


Andy Cogbill

Using Fatigue Damage Spectrum to Correlate Validation Tests to End-Use Environment

Date: June 29, 2017 - 5:00-5:30

Renaissance Indian Wells Resort & Spa, Indian Wells, CA

Andy Cogbill will be presenting at the NSMMS\CRASTE 2017..

 

Abstract: The damage that a product experiences due to the vibration stresses placed upon it causes failures. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in qualification testing in the laboratory. As data is collected from multiple launches testing can be improved to incorporate the additional data. Fatigue Damage Spectrum provides the tool to improve qualification tests as more launch data becomes available.


Kevin VP

Understanding Transducer Calibration and Recent Technological Improvements

Date: August 17, 2017 - 1:00-2:00 pm

Gaylord National Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the NCSLI Workshop and Symposium 2017..

 

Abstract: Transducer calibration is of upmost importance in any laboratory environment to ensure the accuracy of data. Significant advancements have been made with accelerometer calibration systems and now companies can perform highly accurate calibrations in-house with uncertainties equal to or exceeding those provided by an outside source. These advancements include the potential for test automation, superior reporting capability, tighter tolerances, the ability to read/re-write TEDS information, and faster turn-around times. Performing transducer calibrations in-house eliminates the need to send units outside of the organization, reduces downtime, and saves money. The most common method of calibration is the NIST approved back-to-back calibration method. The three primary components are: a controller, a back-to-back accelerometer, and a calibration shaker. The sensor under test is properly torqued to the reference standard and vibrated at multiple discrete frequencies across a specified frequency range. The responses from the transducer under test are compared to the responses of the known standard and a new sensitivity is calculated from this data. The opportunity for error exists from many sources, many of which can be controlled by following industry standards and processes. The potential for mistakes can be minimized with a well-designed system and an understanding of the calibration process.


Dan Pichan

Fatigue Damage Spectrum – Application Study

Date: September 13, 2017: 10:15 – 11:00am

Tokyo Big Sight, Tokyo, Japan

Dan Pichan will be presenting at the Test 2017.

 

Abstract: The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests. Question #1: What random profile is needed (and for how much time) to accurately simulate the end use environment over the life-cycle of my product? Question #2: My product operates in many different vibration environments, how can I confidently combine them into one accelerated test? Question #3: How can I use the FDS to accelerate my test?

**More speaking events, tbd

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